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3 Threats to Summer Health

Threats to Summer Health
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For some reason, summer brings us all to life. Despite the sometimes unbearable heat here in Charleston, South Carolina, we feel more driven to get out and make the most of our time with friends and family. Whether it's a barbecue, a trip to the pool, or a road trip, summer is meant to be enjoyed. But it can quickly become difficult to enjoy the weather when your health takes a hit.

No one wants to be stuck inside with a fever, a cough, or a raging headache while everyone else is out enjoying themselves. You may be able to control your indoor air quality, but what about when you go outside? There's no one cure for summer health issues, but watching out for these threats will help keep you out of bed and on your feet.

Dehydration

You know you should be drinking more water in the summer, but it's not a habit and so it slips the mind. Then, one afternoon, you're enjoying a game of soccer with friends and you suddenly get dizzy, light-headed, and your mouth tastes funny. You've fallen victim to one of the most prevalent summer health threats: dehydration. Dehydration occurs when you haven't drunk enough fluids to replace those that left your body through sweat. If dehydration gets bad enough, it can lead to heat stroke, where internal temperatures skyrocket to dangerous levels, and you may throw up, pass out, or even have a seizure.

Fortunately, the cure for dehydration is simple. Every day, you should take in around 12 to 15 glasses of fluids. That may sound like a lot, but it's what your body required on hot andhumid days. If you're outside, take plenty of breaks in the shade and avoid planning activities for the hottest parts of the day.

Asthma Attacks

If you or kids have asthma, you know all too well the extra care you should take at all times. During the summer, asthma attacks increase because of higher pollution levels, more pollen in the air, and more mold hidden in dark, wet places. These threats can quickly set off an asthmatic reaction, even if you think you can handle it.

It's always better to be safe than sorry. Take controlled medication as prescribed and cut off any possible mold growth with a dehumidifier. If you have plans to go outside on a certain day, check the air pollution and pollen levels before leaving the home. If levels are high, don't take the chance. Stay inside with the air conditioning going and enjoy some quiet time.

Insect Stings

Nothing will ruin an outdoor activity quicker than a wasp sting. And no one likes waking up the morning after a trip to the lake to find their body covered with itchy mosquito bites. Usually bug bites are a little painful and a little irritating, but for some, it can lead to violent reactions and even hospitalization. In extreme cases, bites can cause extreme pain, hives, and swelling that spread across the body; trouble breathing; swelling of the tongue and face; dizziness; and feeling like you'll pass out. Watch for those symptoms. If you see them in yourself, get to the hospital.

Sometimes bug stings are unavoidable, but there are definitely measures you can take to limit the amount of stings and their effect. The easiest way to avoid insect stings and bites, of course, is to avoid going outside altogther. But who wants to do that during such a beautiful summer? When you head out, wear light-colored clothing without any floral patterns. Bees and wasps will also congregate around food and sugary drinks like soda, so do what you can to avoid these, or keep them hidden. In terms of mosquitos, long sleeves and long pants, as well as a layer of bug spray, should keep those pests away.

The best thing you can do to hold off threats to your health this summer is identify what you're susceptible to. Doing so will make staying healthy much easier. To ensure that your home doesn't become a threat to your health with poor indoor air quality, call M and B Heating and Air today at 843-628-1775.

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